Map

Interactive Map Of Our Trail

Detailed Maps Of Trail Sections, Access Points, Camps, Teepees And More.

K - L (Coles Brook to Heath Steele Bridge)

 Distance

7 km

 Parking

Heath Steel Bridge

 Manager

Samuel Turcotte (samuel_turcotte7@hotmail.com)

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Hard

This section of the trail passes through outstanding stands of maple trees. At Cole’s Brook, consider taking an hour to explore up that picturesque brook. As you go up further towards Heath Steele Bridge, you will get to enjoy a flatter surface to walk on, as the trail uses bits of old abandoned roads.

L - M (Heath Steele Bridge to 40 mile Brook)

 Distance

6.5 km

 Parking

Heath Steel Bridge or 40 Mile Brook (4 km from Heath Steele-Nepisiguit River road split or the first bridge you encounter going upriver from that split). Access M needs a river crossing on foot.

 Manager

Alfred Arseneau a.arseneau@rogers.com

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate

This one is moderate in difficulty overall, but beware of a few gaps between big moss covered boulder rocks, where your foot can go thru, in the middle of this section. 2/3 of the trails, closest to Heath Steele runs on a high ridge and 1/3 by the river near 40 Mile Brook. You will appreciate many amazing old cedars and yellow birch, ferns and rock formations. Note that the access M needs a river crossing from the 40 Mile brook parking area (see parking section).

M - N (40 mile Brook to 44 mile Brook)

 Distance

6.5 km

 Sponsor

Adopt a section

 Parking

40 or 44 Mile Brook (needs river crossing), which are at 4 km and 9.5 km respectively from the road split Nepisiguit road / Heat Steele (430), or at the 2 first bridges you will encounter going upriver from that split.

 Manager

Alfred Arseneau a.arseneau@rogers.com

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate

Another gorgeous section, often hugging the river closely. The challenge if you want to hike that section only is the need to do 2 river crossings at the access M and N (see parking). The other challenge might be crossing Otter brook at high water levels in the spring and fall. We will eventually get a bridge there.

N - O (44 mile Brook to below Indian Falls)

 Distance

5 km

 Sponsor

Adopt a section

 Parking

44 Mile Brook or access road below Indian Falls (both need a river crossing). Access N and O are at 9.5 km and 14.7 km respectively from the Nepisiguit River / Heat Steele road split.

 Manager

Rod O'Connell roconnel@rogers.com

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate

The trail mostly hugs the river among cedar patches. The quiet and beautiful forest makes up for the roots and wet spots you have to deal with on this section of the trail. Note that if you hike that section only, you will need to do 2 river crossing on foot at both access.

O - P (Indian Falls to Indian Falls Depot)

 Distance

7.5 km

 Parking

Accès road below Indian Falls and Indian Falls Depot, which are at 14.7 km and 20.6 km respectively from the Nepisiguit road / Heat Steele split (430)

 Manager

Samuel Daigle (shopdaigle@gmail.com)

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Hard

This section of trail is fabulous in many ways. It passes by the impressive Indians Falls and through a nice mix of mature forest. It squeezes between a beaver pond and the river, where you can easily spot high bush cranberries in the fall. Note that if you hike that section only, you will have to do river crossings on foot at both access (see parking).

P - Q (Indian Falls Depot to Devil’s Elbow)

 Distance

8 km

 Sponsor

Adopt a section

 Parking

Indian Falls Depot and Devil's Elbow access roads, which are at 20.6 km and 27.5 km respectively from the Nepisiguit road / Heat Steele road split. Both access needs a river crossing on foot.

 Manager

Adopt a section

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Hard

This is one of the longest section and also gives you the opportunity to hike one of the best side trails on the Mi’gmaq Trail. About 1 km going upriver from Indian Falls Depot, look on your left as you see a bare mountain top. It’s Mount Denys. Not long after that, you will see pink flags going away from the trail towards the mountain top. You will go past Lost Lake before you get there. Be careful walking up the mountain as moss covers cracks between the boulders. It’ best to regularly poke with a stick before putting your foot down. We don’t encourage you to go right to the top, as it’s a protected area and the view is not better than climbing about ¾ of the way up. From the last pink flag, you will be rewarded by one of the best views of the province as you see the Nepisiguit River curving around almost as far as the eyes can see. As you make your way further upriver towards access Q, just below Emery's bogan, the trail will steer away a little bit from the river as it goes around private property and a piece of land flooded by beaver dams. Note that if you just do this section of the trail, you will need to do 2 river crossings at both access.

Q - R (Devil’s Elbow to Popple Depot)

 Distance

10.5 km

 Sponsor

Websolutions.ca

 Parking

Access road at Devil's Elbow (needs a river crossing on foot) and Popple Depot, which are 27.5 km and 35.8 km respectively from the Nepisiguit road / Heath Steele road split. Access R is on the south side of Popple Depot Bridge.

 Manager

Bruno Haché

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Hard

This section steers away a bit from the river at Blue Ledge because of wet lands and again before reaching Popple Depot, using an old road, as we need to access the old bridge to cross the Big South river branch. That old road stretches about 1 km from the old Governor Lodge to the Big South Bridge and another 2.5 km to Popple Depot. Note that access R is on the south side of Popple Depot Bridge and access Q needs a river crossing on foot (see parking). For these reasons and because of the lack of access roads, it is the second longest section, but doesn't have a lot of altitude changes and is definitively still beautiful even if it uses an old road for 3-4 km as you walk among stands of big trees and squeeze around big rock boulders. There is a nice cold spring on the trail about 2-3 km upriver from access Q (we still suggest filtering it).

R - S (Popple Depot to Pentland Brook)

 Distance

9 km

 Parking

Popple Depot near the bridge or at the Pentland Brook access road (S), but note that you will have to do a river crossing there to reach the trail

 Manager

Nat Bepperling

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate

This was the last section cut to complete the trail. From the south side of Popple Depot bridge, just across where you come out of the Nepisiguit South Branch road, you make about 100 meters across a mossy floor to an opening and small road leading to the rangers camp on your right. Share that a few meters before picking-up the single track trail in the forest just ahead. The trail follows the river passing Corker's Gulch and squezing in between Mount Latour and Mount Marie looking at each other from both sides of the river. Despite the increasing mountains as you make your way towards Mount Carleton, this section of the trail doesn't have too many elevation changes. Access S is at the level of Pentland brook which empties on the other side of the Nepisiguit River.

S - T (Pentland Brook to McEwen’s Bridge)

 Distance

7 km

 Sponsor

Adopt a section

 Parking

McEwen's Bridge or Pentland's Brook (but need to cross the river)

 Manager

Karl Branch

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Hard

This is a fairly easy trail as it uses for the most part an old service road. If you want to challenge yourself on this section however, you can take a side trail up to Bailey’s Chasm which starts from the trail about half a km past a small brook that is about 1 km above 69 Mile Brook. Be careful walking up the mountain as moss covers cracks between the boulders. It’ best to regularly poke with a stick before putting your foot down. The view from the ledge of that sheer drop however will certainly make up for your efforts.

T - U (McEwen’s Bridge to Bathurst Lake)

 Distance

11 km

 Sponsor

Adopt a section

 Parking

McEwen's Bridge or Bathurst Lake

 Manager

Nathalie Theriault

 Trail Difficulty: Moderate

This trail starts across the river from the end of the river road to the old McEwen’s Bridge (some remnants only). It takes you on an old service road to the Little South Branch which you will have to cross. After another km on another old abandoned road by the river, you reach Silver Brook. Contemplating Silver Brook meadow, it's hard to imagine much happened there in the past, but Mile 72 at the mouth of that brook on the Nepisiguit River, was the site of Silver Brook Farm. W.F. Ganong took pictures of that spot during his travels with Arthur Henry Pierce. It also supported lumber camp operations and was a supply storage area for lumbermen in the 1800s and the going into the early 1900s. The Bathurst Lumber Co had on this property, what was called a bearhouse, a depot used to store supplies for the lumbermen. Containing salt pork, flour, beans, corn meal and spices (the staple diet of lumbermen), it needed to be made proof by strong barricades against the assaults of marauding bears. The trail then passes in between Mount Teneriffe and Mount Cooney, through a fairytale like old growth mossy forest for about 6 km. Afterwards, it takes you on a shared but small and quiet service road for another 3-4 km until you reach the camps of Camp Lake and your final destination to Mount Carleton Park. You might want to enjoy a good night’s rest before tackling Mount Bailey, Sagamook and Carleton!

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